Tuesday, September 19, 2006

Day 1














Last Thursday, when my hopes for a break were dashed by an invitation to participate in a group show, I was completely overwhelmed by what's ahead of me in the next few months. Eight large sized paintings to be painted and delivered by October 4 and then another show to prepare for immediately after that would surely send me over the edge right? That's what I thought, except after puttering around in my studio for the last few days, making space for the new works and preparing the panels, I am actually pretty excited about this! Although I paint barns fairly often I haven't done a lot of them lately and I certainly haven't done any really larger sized ones recently. After going through my barn photo stash, I realized that because of the panel size, I could paint a few barns that I usually pass over because they hadn't seemed appropriate for a small scale format. A few of the barns have signs on them which I am really looking forward to including as well (often I eliminate the signs in the smaller pieces).

I thought that I would have to limit my posting here for the next 2 weeks but now I am thinking that I might just track this whole thing on the blog. It may be just pictures on some days, however less yakking from me might be a refreshing change of pace. heh. And I will probably be showing mostly long shots of the paintings because, and don't take this personally, I don't really like to discuss my actual painting process too much. Kinda spoils the mood for me, know what I mean? But if you have any questions, go ahead and ask and I might answer.

So here we go.

On Sunday I gessoed eight panels. Monday morning I had to sand them a bit, not too much though, I like the texture of the brush marks, plus I am kind of lazy. I narrowed down the images I felt like doing, which can vary depending on how I feel on any given day. I managed to complete 6 under paintings on Monday. Five are barns, one is a large landscape meant for Salt Meadow Gallery. Just to throw a wrench in the works, I still have to meet a few other obligations, including new work to Harrison Gallery next week. Luckily, I have about eight under paintings already prepared that I will work on while the barn under paintings dry over the next few days. So I am feeling pretty good about getting those done. Anyway, as usual, I am feeling exhilarated after completing a new batch of under paintings and at this point everything looks really good and positive. One problem is again, the size of my studio. I have picture rails up on the walls where I keep the work in progress. It's a good way to also see if I need to fix anything before the paint sets up, as sometimes I miss really obvious things and looking at them on the wall helps with that. Unfortunately, because I have limited space and since I have 6 large pieces going all at once, they are all sitting vertically, while the images are horizontal. Since it's not usually a good idea to move them around too much while they are drying, I am just going to have to cross my fingers and hope that I didn't miss anything this time.



13 comments:

Ann K. said...

I'm looking forward to seeing your new paintings emerge...the painting progress is very mysterious and exciting to me, not being a painter myself. So where in the process do you wield this magical $200 brush?

KJ said...

I think I prefer 'long shots' to really get a feel for the work. Putting a painting into real space can tell more about it than a detailed process report.

James Wolanin said...

Very cool Tracy. It's always interesting to see the process. I really like the underpaintings! Do you ever experiment with different color underpaintings?

steven larose said...

What? No assistant? No work-study help?

Tracy said...

Thanks Ann, I will be using the brush on Wednesday when I do the first glaze. The angels will sing...

Karen, I agree about long shots. I have never really documented my process, so this will be interesting.

James, What you see is the result of MUCH experimentation! When I started painting again a few years back I tried numerous colors until after about a year I found the combination that really clicked for me. So I have been using these particular colors for about 2 years, not very long really. I am sure that at some point I will move to a different color, but for now I still feel like these are working for me. I do monochromatic paintings occasionally in brown or in dark blue but those are too dark to glaze over usually. Geez, should have written a post!

Steven, I wish! Actually, I am not sure what I'd have an assistant do-but I could see having one of my kids helping me out at some point in the next few years, maybe with paperwork or framing. Cheap labor, you know.

meno said...

Thank you for doing this for us. I am really excited to see the process as i know next to nothing about it all.

Tracy said...

Meno, I am fairly close to total burn out but I think this will help me stay focused. I hope it will be interesting to you.

amber said...

Fantastic that you can do so many at once

I really like the little one with the two dark half circles in the last pic, bottom left corner
Can't explain ,but i think it's very powerful

The Epiphany Artist said...

I love the process too! I love the pictures of your studio LOL I think you have more room than me!

Susan Constanse said...

Wow, you're studio is so clean! I love the drying racks.

Tracy said...

Amber, That piece was one that I did in the first year or so that I started painting again. I am glad you like it.

Terri, Wow, Smaller than mine!? Do you work small?

Susan, I am glad the studio looks clean, but to me it is a total wreck! There is so much stuff everywhere and there is a little path that goes around the room. The drying racks are really handy, I like them too.

Daniela said...

Hi Tracy,

It's so great to see some of your works together.

From some distance, your paintings look even more beautiful.

Tracy said...

Thanks Daniela, they do look different from a distance, and up close there are many subtleties. I should try to get a good close up of the paint surface.